Criminal Defense Bond Hearings

Those who have been charged with a crime have an opportunity to get out of jail before their trial by paying a bond. When someone is arrested they should contact a criminal defense attorney to manage your Criminal Defense Bond Hearing. We can help negotiate the amount of bond required for the charges you face.

A bond is an amount of money that can be paid in lieu of being held in jail pending trial.

Floridians who have been charged with a crime have the right to a bond hearing in order to determine the amount the state will hold while they await trial. In some cases, usually first offenses for minor crimes, there is no bond required. In others, there may be no bond offered by the state. It all depends on the severity of the crime alleged and the history of the person charged.

In contacting an attorney who understands the charges and who understand how the system works, we can get you the best results from your bond hearing. Before you call a bail bondsman or try to go it on your own, contact us.

If you or someone you care about has been charged with an offense, has been arrested or there has a warrant out for their arrest, you may need information about bonds:

A bond is a financial security paid to let you out of jail pending trial. The amount of money is meant to guarantee good behavior and attendance in court while the case is pending. If the person out on bond fails to show up to court, gets a new charge, or violates conditions the judge gave them, the money may be forfeited and not returned.

There are several types of bond in Florida that you might take advantage of depending on your need and the crime you were charged with. For information on what might best work for you, contact us. We can attend your bond hearing and ensure you get the type of bond that best works for your situation.

How is the bond amount set?
I can't afford bond, what do I do?
I have no bond, what does that mean?
What happens at a bond hearing?
What are conditions of bond?
How is the bond amount set?
  • Judges tend to follow a set schedule based on the severity of the charge in determining bond. They also take into consideration criminal history, ability to afford bond, aggravating or mitigating facts in the case, and prior failures to attend court.
I can't afford bond, what do I do?
  • If you cannot afford the bond, but you can afford around 10% of the bond, a bail bond company can help finance the bond.
  • If you are unable to afford even 10%, or there is no bond, contact an attorney about setting a bond hearing.
I have no bond, what does that mean?
  • Everyone is constitutionally guaranteed a reasonable bond, except in a few circumstances: you are in jail on a life felony, a violation of probation, or you violated conditions of the bond.
  • By contacting an attorney, they may be able to have the Judge listen to evidence showing them why you should get a bond.
What happens at a bond hearing?
  • At a bond hearing, you are permitted to testify to your financial circumstances, your ability to attend court, and information that might persuade the judge that you should be released. Your attorney may also call witnesses, such as family members, to testify to their willingness to help bond you out, their financial position, and your character.
  • The state attorney will have the ability to question you regarding failure to show up to court, may present your criminal record to the judge, and could even bring alleged victims to testify.
  • After hearing all of the evidence, the judge may set a bond, lower a bond, or deny the motion.
What are conditions of bond?
  • The judge may give you rules to follow while out on bond until your case is resolved. Standard conditions include: no drugs, alcohol, or firearms, no new arrests, and not contacting the alleged victim.
  • Additionally, the judge may order conditions specific to the facts of your case, like: no contact with co-defendants, a curfew, drug testing, or checking in with a pre-trial services officer.

At Jordan Law we cover all types of criminal charges in Florida. If you or a loved one have been charged with a crime then call us today. Whether it be a third-degree misdemeanor or a charge that could lead to a life behind bars, we are here to help you navigate the criminal law system. Jordan Law specializes in Criminal Defense and we are ready to put our expertise to use for you.

Menu